Browse Source

current snapshot

master
katherine 2 years ago
parent
commit
90ebce75d8
Signed by: ageha GPG Key ID: 2A93AF3EA71C905F
  1. 2
      README.md
  2. 31
      unix_cli_crash-and-burn_course/unix_cli_crash-and-burn_course.md

2
README.md

@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
this repository will contain any tutorials i feel like writing.
### currently finished
### complete
### in-progress

31
unix_cli_crash-and-burn_course/unix_cli_crash-and-burn_course.md

@ -19,13 +19,13 @@ first, the basics
### what is a "shell"?!
a shell is (for the purposes of this tutorial) a program that provides a
command line interface (cli) to a user. that is to say, it's the program that
reads commands you type, does things, and spits output back at you. when a user
logs into a unix-like system, the shell is the first process executed under
that user's account ("process" meaning "a currently-running instance of a
program"). this instance of the shell is called, predictably, a "login shell".
the user might also run a second instance of a shell later on (by e.g. opening
up a terminal emulator). that instance is a "non-login shell".
command line interface (cli) to a user. it's the program that reads commands
you type, does things, and spits output back at you. when a user logs into a
unix-like system, the shell is the first process executed under that user's
account ("process" meaning "a currently-running instance of a program"). this
instance of the shell is called, predictably, a "login shell". the user might
also run a second instance of a shell later on (by e.g. opening up a terminal
emulator). that instance is a "non-login shell".
you might think "but when i login, i don't get a shell. i get a desktop!!", or
something to that effect. modern unix-likes that run graphical desktops
@ -627,10 +627,10 @@ some practical examples
-----------------------
ok, now that we're through all that, time to give some examples of things you
can start applying right away! (or at least get an idea of how this stuff
day-to-day works)
can start applying right away! (or at least use to get an idea of how this
stuff works in real life)
### mass-rename files in a directory
### file processing en masse
### make your aliases portable
@ -748,9 +748,8 @@ generally referred to as "the unix philosophy", the concept that a program or
utility should tackle one well-defined problem and solve it "elegantly", rather
than half a dozen problems poorly, has long been a central thought for any
programmer working within a unix environment. recently, however, there has been
some internal conflict over this concept, as the rise of massive, integrated
systems like GNOME and SystemD has begun to conquer the modern unix
workstation.
some internal conflict over this concept, as massive, integrated systems like
GNOME and SystemD have begun to conquer the modern unix workstation.
currently confined mostly to linux distributions, this development still is
very worrying both for reasons of stability and diversity. such a "monolithic"
@ -833,8 +832,8 @@ remember, `man` is your friend!
<dd>also list information about a file. more human-readable</dd>
<dt>du</dt>
<dd>display the sizes of files</dd>
<dt>du</dt>
<dd>display disc usage</dd>
<dt>df</dt>
<dd>display total disc usage</dd>
<dt>pwd</dt>
<dd>"print working directory". more useful from scripts than interactive shell-ing, really</dd>
</dl>
@ -858,7 +857,7 @@ remember, `man` is your friend!
<dt>chmod</dt>
<dd>modify a file's <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_system_permissions">permissions</a></dd>
<dt>chown</dt>
<dd>give ownership of a file to a different user. useful for tweaking permissions of things</dd>
<dd>give ownership of a file to a different user</dd>
<dt>mount</dt>
<dd>join an external filesystem to the system file tree (i.e. make it available through a directory somewhere)</dd>
<dt>umount</dt>

Loading…
Cancel
Save